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'Tis Monday - trinalin thinks things through — LiveJournal
trinalin
trinalin
'Tis Monday
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hergrace From: hergrace Date: January 26th, 2008 01:16 pm (UTC) (Link)
I'll reiterate that I wish it were you teaching Xian's AP Chem class and not the woman he has now. Here -- let me ask you one. You've given your kids a multi-choice test. You like it when they show their work. But, when a kid gets the right answer, but doesn't show the work, how do you count it?

(hint: the teacher in question takes the entire problem OFF...how's that for inspiring your students....)
trinalin From: trinalin Date: January 26th, 2008 03:29 pm (UTC) (Link)
For multiple guess questions, if they're right they're right, if they're wrong they're wrong. (Though occasionally I've noticed I've written a confusing question and might have 2 answers which I'll allow.) I don't require work for those. (My whole reason for doing multiple guess tests is to make grading easier on me. Heh. Short answer tests are easy to write, tell me a great deal on how kids understand or misunderstand the subject, but are horrible to grade. Multiple guess are horrible to write, usually not the best indicator of understanding, but easy to grade. At the start of the year, I usually have all short answer. By the end, they're mostly Multiple Guess with a few short answer.)

However, in bold, underlined and italics at the beginning of a short answer test, I have "No work means no credit!" There are usually 2-5 problems (maybe more on physics) which might require work. Right answer, no work = 0 points. I want to see the process the student is doing.

Conversely, if a student shows their work and comes up with the goobered answer, but maybe it was only due to a calculation error, they get most of the points. (Also, if they forget units, that's 1/5th off for the question. That means they'd get 8/10 for that question on my short answer tests.)

BTW, AP chem sounds like too much work to teach. And at our school, they probably would not provide the total time required to teach AP chem. :-)
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